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Tuesday, November 22, 2011

Insignia of the U.S. Army Infantry Divisions (Part 2)



Well, I guess every artist would occasionally end up in that special place, where you re-visit your old work and have an overpowering urge to re-do some or all of it… In my case, this is pretty much an ongoing battle. Every time I look at something I created even just a week ago, I manage to notice a thing or two that could have been done better. Usually, I just ignore the urge. But, not this time. The problem was with insignia of the active U.S. Army Infantry Divisions (you can catch my earlier post here), one of the earliest chapters of my “Military Insignia 3D” project. (The earliest and one the most important ones…) One of the major flaws I noticed -  the textures for shoulder sleeve insignia (SSI) were all over the place. Later in the project, as I was experimenting and trying new techniques, I began to imitate fabric textures for SSIs, to make them look as realistic as possible. This was not the case with my earlier versions of the divisional SSIs, and I wasn’t too happy about it. Of course, this would mean that I had eventually to re-visit every single chapter of the project, involving fabric patches of any kind and re-make them… This would translate into many hours of work, and a major setback for the whole project, but I have concluded, that it was well worth the effort. Logically, the first ones to get an overhaul would be my divisional patches of U.S. Infantry. While I was at it, re-making pretty much all the divisional SSIs using my new fabric textures, I also added a few missing combat service identification badges (CSIB), re-made some of the DUIs, as well as added six new divisions - the 5th, 7th, 8th, 9th, 23rd and 24th IDs, which I did not cover before. All six were among the recently inactivated, but historically very important divisions, active until very recent time, and the ones, which played important roles during WWII and the Vietnam wars.  Below are the results of this artistic detour.




The 1st Infantry Division has seen continuous service since its organization in 1917 The insignia of the 1st Infantry Division originated in World War I. There are two theories as to how the idea of the patch came about. The first theory states that the 1st Division supply trucks were manufactured in England. To make sure the 1st Division's trucks were not confused with other allies, the drivers would paint a huge "1" on the side of each truck. Later, the division engineers would go even farther and put a red number one on their sleeves. A second theory also exists. In this theory, a general of the division decided the unit should have a shoulder insignia. He decided to cut a red numeral "1" from his flannel underwear. When he showed his prototype to his men, one lieutenant said, "the general's underwear is showing!" Offended, the general challenged the young lieutenant to come up with something better. So, the young officer cut a piece of gray cloth from the uniform of a captured soldier, and placed the red "1" on top.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 1st Division on 31 October 1918, as a red number "1" and amended on 31 March 1927, to include the background of the insignia in the design. It was redesignated for the 1st Infantry Division on 19 August 1942. The insignia was amended to revise the description on 6 October 1972.

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for Headquarters, Headquarters Detachment and Headquarters, Special Troops, 1st Division on 9 December 1930. It was redesignated for wear by all non-color-bearing elements of the 1st Infantry Division on 2 September 1965. The insignia was amended to revise the description and add a symbolism on 14 January 1974. The colors red and blue are from the distinguishing flags of Infantry Divisions. The figure portion is that of the 1st Infantry Division Monument, located in Washington, DC.




The 2nd Infantry Division ("Indianhead") (2ID or 2nd ID) is a formation of the United States Army. Its current primary mission is the defense of South Korea in the initial stages of an invasion from North Korea until other American units can arrive. There are approximately 30,000 soldiers in the 2nd Infantry Division.
The 2nd Infantry Division, unlike any other division in the Army, is made up partially of Korean soldiers, called KATUSAs (Korean Augmentation to US Army). This program began in 1950 by agreement with South Korean President Syngman Rhee. Some 27,000 KATUSAs served with the US forces at the end of the Korean War. As of May 2006, approximately 1,100 KATUSA Soldiers serve with 2ID. There were also more than 3,000 Dutch soldiers assigned to the division between 1950 and 1954.
From November 2003 to November 2004, the 3rd Brigade Stryker Brigade Combat Team deployed from Fort Lewis, Washington in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. In the sands of Iraq the 3rd Brigade Stryker Brigade Combat Team proved the value of the Stryker Brigade concept in combat and logistics operations.
On 17 February 2009, President Barack Obama ordered 4,000 soldiers of the 5th Stryker Brigade Combat Team out of Ft. Lewis Washington to Afghanistan. In July 2010, the 5th Stryker Brigade Combat Team was inactivated and reflagged as the 2nd Stryker Brigade Combat Team. The Brigade's Special Troops Battalion was also inactivated and reflagged and the rest of the subordinate units were reassigned to the reactivated 2nd SBCT.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally authorized for the 2d Division on 6 November 1918 and officially announced by The Adjutant General letter dated 21 June 1922. It was amended to correct the description on 7 November 1927. The insignia was redesignated for the 2d Infantry Division effective 1 August 1942, and amended to change the dimensions. The star has played an important part in our history from the days of the Colonies to the present time. The Indian signifies the first and original American. These devices were originally established by the division to use as vehicle markings and to identify the vehicles as all American.

The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 1 May 1968. The colors blue and white (silver) allude to Infantry; the tomahawk is used in lieu of the Indian head which appears on the shoulder sleeve insignia for the 2d Infantry Division. The fleur-de-lis is for France where the unit saw its first combat experience during World War I and the feathers denote the three conflicts (World Wars I and II and Korea) in which the unit has participated.




The 3rd Infantry Division (nicknamed the Marne Division) is a United States Army infantry division based at Fort Stewart, Georgia. It is a direct subordinate unit of the XVIII Airborne Corps and U.S. Army Forces Command
The division fought in France in World War I. In World War II, it fought in North Africa, then Italy before fighting in France and finally Germany.
The 3rd Infantry Division was the first conventional U.S. unit to enter Baghdad during the 2003 invasion, and the first division to serve four tours in Iraq. Its current organization includes four brigade combat teams, one aviation brigade, and support elements. The 3rd Infantry Division has one of the most successful combat records of any U.S. Army division. It has paid a high price for this distinction, suffering more than 50,000 wartime casualties. Fifty-one members of the 3rd Infantry Division have been awarded the Medal of Honor.
Early in 2003 the entire division deployed in weeks to Kuwait. It was called on subsequently to spearhead Coalition forces in Operation Iraqi Freedom, fighting its way to Baghdad in early April, leading to the end of the Saddam Hussein government. Beginning in 2004, the 3rd began re-organizing. The division shifted from three maneuver brigades to four "units of action", which are essentially smaller brigade formations, with one infantry, one armor, one cavalry, and one artillery battalion in each. The former Engineer Brigade became the 4th Brigade at Fort Stewart. In January 2005, the Third Infantry Division became the first Army Division to serve a second tour in Iraq. The division headquarters took control of the Multi-National Division Baghdad, MND-B, headquartered at Camp Liberty and with responsibility for the greater Baghdad area. The Division redeployed to Fort Stewart and Fort Benning in January 2006. On 17 November 2006, the Army announced that the Third Infantry Division is scheduled to return to Iraq in 2007 and thus become the first Army division to serve three tours in Iraq. The division headquarters became the leadership organization of MND-C (Multi-National Division Central), a new command established south of Baghdad as part of the Iraq War troop surge of 2007.
The 3rd Infantry Division assumed command of the Multi-National Division-North, now United States Division-North, in October 2009. This milestone marked the division’s fourth tour in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom (I, III, V, and VII). The Marne Division has elements operating in every area of Iraq, from North, Center and South, as the mission changes from Operation Iraqi Freedom to Operation New Dawn on 1 Sept. 2010. With the advent of Operation New Dawn, the focus will shift from combat operations to stability and Advise & Assist operations throughout all Iraq’s provinces.

This insignia was originally approved by telegram for the 3d Division on 24 October 1918. It was officially announced on 20 June 1922. The insignia was amended to correct the wording of the description on 11 October 1922. It was redesignated for the 3d Infantry Division retroactive to 1 August 1942 and amended to include the border in the description. The three white stripes of the insignia are symbolical of the three major operations in which the division participated during World War I. The blue field symbolizes the loyalty of those who placed their lives on the altar of self-sacrifice in defense of the American ideals of liberty and democracy.

The Distinctive Unit Insignia was approved on 27 August 1965. The rock, inscription and wyvern refer to the two designations by which men of the 3d Infantry Division are popularly known; i.e., “Marne Men” and “Blue and White Devils”. The rock represents the Division’s firm stand against the German offensive at the Marne River during World War I. It was there that it became known as the “Rock of the Marne” and there that the Commanding Officer, General Joseph Dickman, stated “Nous Resterous La”. The wyvern, a heraldic form of the devil, bears the Division’s blue and white stripes on its wing in commemoration of the Division’s action at Anzio, Italy, during World War II where they were called “Blue and White Devils” by the enemy.




The 4th Infantry Division ("Ivy Division") is a modular division of the United States Army based at Fort Carson, Colorado, with four brigade combat teams. It is a very technically advanced combat division in the U.S. Army.
The division has both officially approved and soldiering nicknames; the first, "Ivy," is a play on words of the Roman numeral IV or 4. Ivy leaves also symbolize tenacity and fidelity which is the basis of the division's motto: "Steadfast and Loyal". The second nickname, "Iron Horse", has been recently adopted to indicate the speed and power of the division. As is often the case, soldier monikers also exist as puns on nicknames approved by the military brass, such as Poison Ivy Division as well as The Funky Fourth during the Vietnam era.
The division was unable to deploy in time to start the Iraq invasion but joined it as a follow-on force in April 2003 attacking toward Tikrit and Mosul, and later became a major part of occupation forces during the post-war period. Headquartered in Saddam Hussein's former palaces, the 4th ID was deployed in the northern area of the Sunni Triangle near Tikrit. The 4th Infantry Division was spread all over Northern Iraq from Kirkuk to the Iranian border as far south as Balad Air Base in Balad, Iraq. The 3rd Brigade Combat Team Headquarters was assigned to Balad Air Base. The 4th Infantry Division also disarmed the MEK warriors in Northern Iraq in July–August 2003.
On 13 December 2003, the 1st Brigade of the 4th ID provided perimeter security for the U.S. Special Operations Forces that captured Saddam Hussein, former President of Iraq. The division rotated out of Iraq in the Spring of 2004, and was relieved by the 1st Infantry Division. The division's second deployment to Iraq began in the fall of 2005. The division headquarters replaced the 3rd Infantry Division, which had been directing security operations as the headquarters for Multi-National Division – Baghdad. The 4th ID assumed responsibility on 7 January 2006 for four provinces in central and southern Iraq: Baghdad, Karbala, An-Najaf and Babil. On 7 January 2006, MND-Baghdad also assumed responsibility for training Iraqi security forces and conducting security operations in the four provinces. The third deployment to Iraq was in 2007–2009.
Immediately, the division's brigades started preparing for their next return to combat. The 4th Infantry Brigade Combat Team has completed a one year tour in Afghanistan that began in May 2009; the 3rd Brigade Combat Team completed a one year deployment to southern Iraq, as an Advise and Assist Brigade, from March 2010 to March 2011; 1st Brigade Combat Team deployed to Afghanistan from July 2010-2011; to be followed by 4ID HQ deploying to Iraq for the fourth time in early fall of 2011. The 2nd Brigade Combat Team, which returned from Iraq late in 2009, is currently in Afghanistan for 2011.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 4th Division on 30 October 1918, without any background specified for the ivy leaf design. The design was embroidered on a square olive background (color of the uniform). It was redesignated for the 4th Infantry Division effective 4 August 1943. On 2 July 1958, the design was changed to reflect the light khaki color background. The insignia was amended to add a symbolism on 1 April 1969. The four leaves allude to the numerical designation of the Division while the word "I-VY" as pronounced, suggests the characters used in the formation of the Roman numeral "IV." Ivy leaves are also symbolic of fidelity and tenacity.

The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 16 November 1965. The ivy leaf is taken from the 4th Infantry Division shoulder sleeve insignia. The motto is associated with the Division.




The 5th Infantry Division (Mechanized)—nicknamed the Red Diamond, the Red Devils, or die Roten Teufel—was an infantry division of the United States Army that served in World War I, World War II and the Vietnam War, and with NATO and the U.S. Army III Corps. Its final inactivation occurred on 24 November 1992. The 5th Division was activated on 11 December 1917 at Camp Logan, near Houston, Texas. The entire division had arrived in France by 1 May 1918 and components of the units were deployed into the front line. The 5th Division was activated as part of United States mobilization in response to the outbreak of European war in the fall of 1939, being formed at Fort McClellan, Alabama under the command of Brigadier General Campbell Hodges. The division debarked in Iceland in May 1942, where it replaced the British garrison on this island outpost along the Atlantic convoy routes, and a year later was reorganized and re-designated as the 5th Infantry Division on 24 May 1943. Now commanded by Major General Stafford L. Irwin the 5th Infantry Division landed on Utah Beach, 9 July 1944 and four days later took up defensive positions in the vicinity of Caumont. The division continued operations at Vidouville, Saint-Lô, Angers, Chartres, Fontainebleau, Montereau, Reims, Verdun, Moselle, Dornot, Arnaville, Metz, Lauterbach, Bulge, and the Sauer, where it smashed through the Siegfried Line. The 5th ID became the first Allied unit to cross the Rhine River on the night of 22 March 1945. The 5th ID became the first Allied unit to cross the Rhine River on the night of 22 March 1945. After capturing some 19,000 German soldier, the division continued to Frankfurt-am-Main, clearing and policing the town and its environs, 27–29 March. In April the division, under Major General Albert E. Brown took part in clearing the Ruhr Pocket and then drove across the Czechoslovak border, 1 May, reaching Volary and Vimperk as the war in Europe ended.
Following World War II, the 5th Infantry Division was inactivated on 20 September 1946. However, the division was reactivated on 15 July 1947 under Brigadier General John C. Church. The 1950s saw the division in Germany as part of the US contribution to NATO. The division later returned to the United States and in 1968 was stationed at Fort Carson, Colorado, as a mechanized formation. One of its three combat brigades was dispatched to Vietnam and served there from 1968 until 1971. Its final assignment was to III Corps, with the mission of reinforcement of Europe if a general war was to break out there. In 1989, units of the 5th Division, out of Fort Polk, Louisiana, deployed in support of Operation Nimrod Dancer to "protect American interests" in Panama. First Battalion, 61st Infantry (Mechanized), "Roadrunners" (1st Brigade, 5th ID) was one of the first reinforcing units and remained there until September when there was a hand over to 4th Battalion, Sixth Infantry(Mechanized), "Regulars" (2nd Brigade, 5th ID). 4–6 Infantry was in country and assisted during Operation Just Cause helping to overthrow Panamanian leader Manuel Noriega, and also assisted in an emergency extraction of Delta Force operators engaged in Operation Acid Gambit when their helicopter went down. The division was inactivated for the final time on 24 November 1992 as part of the post-Cold War rundown of US forces.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for 5th Division on 20 Oct 1918. It was amended on 11 Oct 1922 to correct the wording of the description. On 25 May 1943 the insignia was redesignated for the 5th Infantry Division and amended to include the symbolism of the design. The insignia was adopted by the Division upon its arrival in France. The color red was selected as a compliment to the then Commanding General whose branch of the service was the Artillery. The "ace of diamonds" was selected from the trade name "Diamond dye - it never runs." The red diamond represents a well-known problem in bridge building, it is made up of two adjacent isosceles triangles which made for the greatest strength. The Division's nickname is "Red Diamond." It is reported that the Division was latterly known among the Germans opposed to it as the "Red Tigers" and the "Red Devils."

The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 27 Sep 1965. The design symbolizes the piercing of the German Army's Meuse River defenses by the men of the 5th Division in World War I, an achievement which caused the organization to be known as the Meuse Division and gave them their Red Diamond emblem. The operation was described by General Pershing as "one of the most brilliant military feats in the history of the American Army in France."




The 7th Infantry Division was an infantry division of the United States Army. It was activated in December 1917 in World War I, inactivated in August 2006 following the end of the Cold War, and based at Fort Ord, California for most of its history. Although elements of the division saw brief active service in World War I, it is best known for its participation in the Pacific Ocean theater of World War II where it took heavy casualties engaging the Imperial Japanese Army in the Aleutian Islands, Leyte, and Okinawa.
Following the Japanese surrender in 1945, the division was stationed in Japan and Korea, and with the outbreak of the Korean War in 1950 was one of the first units in action. It took part in the Inchon Landings and the advance north until Chinese forces counter-attacked and almost overwhelmed the scattered division. The 7th later went on to fight in the Battle of Pork Chop Hill and the Battle of Old Baldy.
After the Korean War ended, the division returned to the United States. In the late 1980s, it briefly saw action overseas in Operation Golden Pheasant in Honduras and Operation Just Cause in Panama. In the early 1990s, it provided domestic support to the civil authorities in Operation Green Sweep and during the 1992 Los Angeles Riots. The division's final role was as a training and evaluation unit for Army National Guard brigades, which it undertook until its inactivation in 2006. Because of its extensive combat history, the division is highly decorated, and has been featured numerous times in American popular culture.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 7th Division on 23 Oct 1918. It was redesignated for the 7th Infantry Division on 14 Apr 1964, retroactive to 1 Jan 1943, and amended to include the border. The outline of the hourglass alludes to the numerical designation of the division showing two "7's," inverted, one upright.

The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 16 Jun 1965. The design is an adaptation of the hourglass symbol of the 7th Division shoulder sleeve insignia which originated out of the use of two figure sevens which later became triangles to form an hourglass; likewise the colors red and black have been borrowed from the same insignia. The bayonet, a reference to the nickname "Bayonet Division" which became synonymous with the 7th Infantry Division through the unit's participation in the Korean Conflict, is the infantryman's hallmark and symbolizes the fighting spirit of the 7th.




The 8th Infantry Division, ("Pathfinder") was an infantry division of the United States Army during the 20th Century. The division served in World War I, World War II, and Operation Desert Storm. Initially activated in January 1918, the unit did not see combat during World War I and returned to the United States. Activated again on 1 July 1940 as part of the build-up of military forces prior to the United States' entry in to World War II, the division saw extensive action in the European Theatre of Operations. Following World War II, the division was moved to West Germany, where it remained stationed at the Rose Barracks in Bad Kreuznach until it was inactivated on 17 January 1992.
During World War II, after training in Ireland, the 8th Infantry Division landed on Utah Beach, Normandy, 4 July 1944, and entered combat on 7 July. The division participated in operations at Rennes, Brest, Hürtgen Forest, Crozon Peninsula, Brandenberg, Duren and Schwerin. After World War II The 8th Infantry Division was stationed in West Germany.  Elementsof the 8th ID deployed to southern Turkey in support Operation Provide Comfort in the spring of 1991. Upon completion of that tour they wear authorized to the 8th ID 
Shoulder Sleeve Insignia as a combat patch on the left shoulder of their uniform. The 8th Infantry Division was known as both the "Golden Arrow" and "Pathfinder" division during World War II. Both nicknames originated from the division's insignia, which includes a gold arrow to represent the nineteenth-century explorer of California, John Fremont. The division was formed in California in 1918. Later known to many of its post WWII soldiers as Eight Up (Ate Up: a military term meaning out of order, screwed up) and "The Crazy Eight" after the card game.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 8th Division on 8 April 1919. The insignia was redesignated for the 8th Infantry Division retroactive to 15 May 1943 and amended to revise the dimensions of the design and to provide a border space for overedge stitching on 27 February 1970. The nickname of the division, "Pathfinder," is represented by the arrow while the figure "8" identifies the division's designation.

The distinctive unit insignia was authorized on 26 April 1967. The insignia was amended to change the symbolism on 2 August 1967. The design was suggested by the shoulder sleeve insignia of the division. The color blue refers to Infantry and with the red alludes to the background of infantry division flags. "These Are My Credentials" is the division's motto and "Pathfinder" its nickname. The five stars represent service in World War I and participation credit for four World War II campaigns.




The 9th Infantry Division (also known as "Old Reliables", “The Varsity”, “Octofoil”,"Flower Power" or “The Psychedelic Cookie") was created as the 9th Division during World War I, but never deployed overseas. Later, the division was an important unit of the United States Army in World War II and the Vietnam War. It was also activated as a peacetime readiness unit from 1947 to 1962 at Fort Dix, New Jersey, and Fort Carson, Colorado, and from 1972 to 1991 as an active-duty infantry division at Fort Lewis, Washington. Nicknamed the "Old Reliables", the division was eventually inactivated in December 1991.
The 9th Infantry Division was among the first U.S. combat units to engage in offensive ground operations during World War II. The division participated in the WWII Campaigns in Algeria-French Morocco, Tunisia, Sicily, Normandy, North France, Rhineland, Ardennes-Alsace and  Central Europe.
The 9th Division was reactivated on 1 February 1966, and arrived in Vietnam on 16 December 1966 from Fort Riley, Kansas, and its major units departed Vietnam on 27 August 1969 (HHC & 1st BDE) to Hawaii; 27 August 1969 (2nd BDE) to Fort Lewis, Washington; 12 October 1970 (3rd BDE) to Fort Lewis, Washington. On deployment the division was assigned to the III Corps Tactical Zone of Vietnam where it commenced operations in the Dinh Tuong and Long An provinces (6 January-31 May 1967) in Operation Palm Beach.  During the Vietnam War the division's units often served with the Mobile Riverine Force and other US Navy units that made up the Brown Water Navy. Its area of operations was in the rivers and canals of the Mekong Delta from 1967 to 1972. Operation Speedy Express was one significant operation in which the division took part during the war, while the Battle of Ap Bac was one of 22 major combat engagements with North Vietnamese Army and Viet Cong main force units as well as thousands of small contacts during this period during division's presence in Vietnam. One of the more unique units serving with the division was the experimental Armor Platoon (Air Cushion Vehicle) which used the specially designed hovercraft to patrol marshy terrain like the Plain of Reeds along the south Vietnamese/Cambodian border.
Following the Vietnam War the division was stationed at Fort Lewis Washington until its inactivation in 1992. Beginning in the mid-1980s the division served as the high-technology test-bed for the army. This led to the division testing the concept of "motorized infantry", designed to fill the gap between light infantry and heavy mechanized forces. The idea was to create lighter, mobile units capable of rapid deployment with far less aircraft than a heavier mechanized unit. Motorized infantry doctrine concentrated on effectiveness in desert warfare.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 9th Division on 18 Nov 1925. It was redesignated for the 9th Infantry Division on 1 Aug 1942. On 27 Feb 1970 the description was amended to revise the dimensions of the design. The double quatrefoil, which is an heraldic mark of cadency for the ninth son, has been made red and blue, the designating colors of an Infantry Division headquarters flag; the white center is in the color of the numerals for divisional flags.

The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 2 Feb 1966. The red crescent is for the Tunisian campaign; the nine rays of the sun denote the unit's numerical designation, and likewise refer to the campaign in Sicily; the gold disc in center is for Central Europe and the fleur-de-lis thereon represents service in Northern France.




The 10th Mountain Division (Light Infantry) is a light infantry division of the United States Army based at Fort Drum, New York. It is a subordinate unit of the XVIII Airborne Corps and the only division-sized element of the U.S. Army to specialize in fighting under harsh terrain and weather conditions. The division retains the "mountain" designation for historical purposes but is actually organized as a light infantry division.
Activated in 1943, the 10th Mountain Division was the last among currently active divisions to enter combat during World War II. The 10th fought in the mountains of Italy in some of the roughest terrain in the country. After the war, the division was briefly redesignated as the 10th Infantry Division, a training unit, also seeing brief deployment to Germany before inactivation.
Reactivated in 1985, the division saw numerous deployments to contingencies throughout the 1990s. Division elements participated in Operation Desert Storm (Saudi Arabia), Hurricane Andrew disaster relief (Homestead, Florida), Operation Restore Hope and Operation Continue Hope (Somalia), Operation Uphold Democracy (Haiti), Operation Joint Forge (Bosnia and Herzegovina), Operation Joint Guardian (Kosovo), and several deployments as part of the Multinational Force and Observers (Sinai Peninsula). Since 2001, the division and its four combat brigades have seen numerous deployments to both Iraq and Afghanistan in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom, respectively.
Following the 11 September 2001 attacks, elements of the division, including its special troops battalion and the 1-87th Infantry deployed to Afghanistan as part of Operation Enduring Freedom in late 2001. Since then, 10th Mountain participated in prominent operations such as Operation Anaconda, the Fall of Mazar-i-Sharif, and the Battle of Qala-i-Jangi. The division also participated in fighting in the Shahi Khot Valley in 2002.
In 2003, the division's headquarters, along with the 1st Brigade, returned to Afghanistan. Fighting in several small-scale conflicts such as Operation Avalanche, Operation Mountain Resolve, and Operation Mountain Viper, the division maintained a strategy of small units moving through remote regions of the country.
Upon the return of the division headquarters and 1st Brigade, the 10th Mountain Division began the process of transformation into a modular division. In late 2004, 2nd Brigade Combat Team was deployed to Iraq supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom. In 2006, the division was deployed again to Afghanistan to support Operation Enduring Freedom. Its aviation brigade named "Task Force Falcon," had a mission to conduct aviation operations to destroy insurgents and anti-coalition militia. After a one-year rest, the headquarters of the 10th Mountain Division was deployed to Iraq for the first time in April 2008. The 10th Mountain participated in larger scale operations such as Operation Phantom Phoenix.
In January 2009, the 3rd BCT deployed to Logar and Wardak, eastern Afghanistan to relieve the 101st Airborne Division. The division was deployed to Iraq in the fall of 2009, as a part of the 2009–2010 rotation. The 1st Brigade Combat Team was scheduled to deploy to Iraq in late 2009, but deployed instead to Afghanistan in March 2010.  The 3rd Brigade Combat Team deployed to Afghanistan in March 2011.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 10th Light Division on 7 January 1944. It was redesignated for the 10th Mountain Division and a mountain tab was added on 22 November 1944. The authority to wear the mountain tab was rescinded 29 January 1947. The insignia was redesignated for the 10th Infantry Division on 14 December 1948. It was amended to change the description and symbolism on 15 November 1984. The insignia was redesignated for the 10th Mountain Division on 13 February 1985 and authority given to wear the mountain tab. The blue background and the bayonets are symbolic of infantry while the position of the bayonets in saltire simulates the numerical designation of the organization.

This distinctive unit insignia was approved for the 10th Mountain Division on 30 April 1985. The white mountain symbol and the blue wave represent the Division’s World War II combat history in the Northern Apennines and Po Valley campaigns in Italy. The crossed swords are symbolic of wartime service and further suggest the Roman numeral X, the unit’s numerical designation. Scarlet is symbolic of courage and mortal danger, blue denotes steadfastness and loyalty. The gold is for excellence and the white is symbolic of mountain tops and of high aspirations.




The 23rd Infantry Division, more commonly known as the Americal Division of the United States Army was formed in May 1942 on the island of New Caledonia. In the immediate emergency following Pearl Harbor, the United States had hurriedly sent three individual regiments to defend New Caledonia against a feared Japanese attack. This division was formed as one of only two un-numbered divisions to serve in the Army during World War II. At the suggestion of a subordinate, the division's commander, Major General Alexander Patch, requested that the new unit be known as the Americal Division—the name being a contraction of "American, New Caledonian Division". This was unusual, as most U.S. divisions are known by a number. After World War II the Americal Division was officially re-designated as the 23rd Infantry Division. However, it was rarely referred to as such, even on official orders.
During World War II the Americal Division seen action at Guadalcanal, Henderson Field, as well as participated in the offensives across the Matanikau River,  and the Mount Austen complex.
During the Vietnam War, despite its exemplary service in numerous battles and campaigns, the name of the division unfortunately became associated with the My Lai massacre, which was committed by a renegade platoon of the division's subordinate 11th Infantry Brigade, led by Lieutenant William Calley. The Division next moved to the Fiji Islands, beginning 5 March 1943, to assume the defense of the main island of Viti Levu and to engage in extensive training. During the period 25 December 1943 to 12 January 1944 the Americal Division landed on Bougainville, relieving the 3rd Marine Division and was given the task of holding and extending the right half of a previously established perimeter. The Division went on the offensive in March 1944, driving the Japanese east of Mavavia River, 7–9 April, and seizing numerous strategic hill bases during the remainder of the month. Training and long-range patrol activity continued until 30 November 1944 when the Division was relieved. On 8 January 1945, the Division began movement to Leyte and Samar, to take part in cleaning out remaining Japanese forces on those islands, and to invade Biri, Capul, Ticao, and Burias. Relieved, 13 March 1945, on Leyte, the Division landed on Cebu, 26 March, and seized the city and airfield by 28 March. Divisional combat teams made landings on Bohol, Negros, and Mindanao, where they cleared out pockets of resisting Japanese until 17 June when ordered to return to Cebu, arriving on 25 June.
Training continued on Cebu for the proposed invasion of Japan, but the Japanese surrendered on 14 August 1945. On 10 September 1945, the Americal Division landed in Japan and took part in the occupation of the Yokohama-Kawasaki-Yokosuka area. The Division returned to the United States on 21 November 1945, and was inactivated on 12 December 1945. It was reactivated on 1 December 1954 as the 23rd Infantry Division, retaining the name "Americal" as part of its official designation, and served in the Panama Canal Zone until 10 April 1956, when it was again inactivated.
The Americal was reactivated in 1967 in Vietnam. A division-sized task force known as TASK FORCE OREGON was created in Quang Ngai and Quang Tin provinces with brigades from the 25th Infantry Division and 101st Airborne Division, as well as the 196th Light Infantry Brigade, an independent brigade that deployed to Vietnam in 1966, to operate in close cooperation with the 1st Marine Division. As new U.S. brigades arrived in Vietnam, they were assigned to Task Force Oregon, which was re-designated the 23rd Infantry Division (Americal). The Division was composed of the 11th, 196th, and 198th Light Infantry Brigades and divisional support units. The Americal, in Vietnam, suffered a major defeat at the Battle of Kham Duc but was noted for its exemplary performance during TET, The Battle of LoGiang and the Battle of Nui Hoac Ridge (Hill 352). The 198th and 11th Brigades were withdrawn from Vietnam in November 1971, and the Division was inactivated.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the Americal Division on 20 Dec 1943. It was redesignated for the 23d Infantry Division on 4 Nov 1954. The four white stars on the blue field are symbolic of the Southern Cross under which the organization has served.

The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 14 Dec 1967. The saltire (or cross of St. Andrew) alludes to New Caledonia in the Southwest Pacific where the Division was created and first activated 27 May 1942, and with its blue color (for Infantry) and four white stars forms a "Southern Cross" and refers to the Division's shoulder sleeve insignia (approved 20 December 1943) and the area in which the Division initially served. The four stars (the brightest in the Southern Cross constellation) also allude to the four campaigns (Guadacanal, Northern Solomons, Leyte and Southern Philippines) World War II in which the Division participated. The anchor refers to the Presidential Unit Citation (Navy) awarded the Division for Guadacanal and the red arrowhead and Philippine sun for the assault landing, Southern Philippines, and the award of the Philippine Presidential Unit Citation (17 October 1944 to 4 July 1945). The unsheathed sword with point to top refers to Vietnam where the Division was recently activated. In view of the Division's origin and outstanding service in World War II and inasmuch as it was one of the few U.S. Army Divisions to bear a name instead of a number, the Division's former name "Americal" has been taken as a motto, the association with that name being both inspirational and of historical military significance.




The 24th Infantry Division was an infantry division of the United States Army. Before its most recent inactivation in 2006, it was based at Fort Riley, Kansas.
Formed during World War II from the disbanding Hawaiian Division, the division saw action throughout the Pacific theater, first fighting in New Guinea before landing on the Philippine islands of Leyte and Luzon, driving Japanese forces from them. Following the end of the war, the division participated in patrol operations in Japan, and was the first division to respond at the outbreak of the Korean War. For the first 18 months of the war, the division was heavily engaged on the front lines with North Korean and Chinese forces, suffering over 10,000 casualties. It was withdrawn from the front lines to the reserve force for the remainder of the war, but returned to Korea for patrol duty at the end of major combat operations.
After its deployment in Korea, the division was active in Europe and the United States during the Cold War, but saw relatively little combat until the Persian Gulf War, when it faced the Iraqi military. When the United Nations intervened in Kuwait in 1990, the 24th Infantry Division, which was part of the Rapid Deployment Force, was one of the first units deployed to Southwest Asia. Once the attack commenced on 24 February, the 24th Infantry Division formed the east flank of the corps with the 3rd Armored Cavalry Regiment. It blocked the Euphrates River valley to cut off Iraqi forces in Kuwait and little resistance. At this time, the 24th Division's ranks swelled to over 25,000 troops in 34 battalions, commanding 94 helicopters, 241 M1 Abrams tanks, 221 M2 Bradley Armored fighting vehicles, and over 7,800 other vehicles. The 24th Infantry Division performed exceptionally well in the theater; it had been training in desert warfare for several years before the conflict. On 26 February, the 24th Division advanced through the valley and captured Iraqi airfields at Jabbah and Tallil. At the airfields, it encountered entrenched resistance from the Iraqi 37th and 49th Infantry Divisions, as well as the 6th "Nebuchadnezzar" Mechanized Division of the Iraqi Republican Guard. Despite some of the most fierce resistance of the war, the 24th Infantry Division destroyed the Iraqi formations and captured the two airfields the next day. The 24th then moved east with VII Corps and engaged several Iraqi Republican Guard divisions. A few years after that conflict, it was inactivated as part of a post Cold War US military drawdown. The division was reactivated in 1999 as a formation for training and deploying Army National Guard units before inactivating again in 2006.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the Hawaiian Division on 9 Sep 1921. It was redesignated for the 24th Infantry Division on 21 Jul 1944. The taro leaf is a well-known symbol of Hawaii.

The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 19 Oct 1965. The Taro leaf is from the shoulder sleeve insignia of the 24th Infantry Division. The scarlet annulet is taken from the badge formerly approved for the Hawaiian Division Headquarters and Special Troops. The Hawaiian Division was redesignated as the 24th Infantry Division, effective 1 October 1941. The thirteen stars stand for the Division's participation in thirteen campaigns; it is inscribed with the Division's motto "Victory."




The 25th Infantry Division (nicknamed "Tropic Lightning", "ElectricStrawberry", and the Củ Chi National Guard during the Vietnam War) is a U.S. Army division based in Hawaii. The division, which was activated on 1 October 1941 in Hawaii, conducts military operations in the Asia-Pacific region. Its present deployment is composed of Stryker, light infantry, airborne, and aviation units.
The 25th Division was formed from the 27th and 35th Infantry regiments of the original Hawaiian Division. This was a pre-second World War "square division" composed of four infantry regiments. The remaining units of the Hawaiian Division were reorganized as the 24th Infantry Division. These steps, part of the Triangular Division TO&E, were undertaken to provide more flexible orders of battle composed of three regiments.
The division did not take part in the fighting in Afghanistan and Iraq from 2001–2003. However, in early 2004, units from the division deployed to Iraq to take part in the combat operations of that country. The 2nd Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment ("Wolfhounds") operated in the volatile Paktika Province on the border with Pakistan in the Waziristan region. In July 2005, a 4th Brigade was added to the 25th Infantry Division as an airborne brigade stationed in Fort Richardson, Alaska. It deployed in October 2006 in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. The 2nd Brigade began its transformation as a Stryker Brigade Combat Team while the 3rd Brigade began its transformation as a Unit of Action (UA) in the same year. The (Light) status was dropped from the division name in January 2006. On 15 December 2006 the former 172nd Infantry Brigade reflagged as the 1st Brigade, 25th Infantry Division as the former 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team at Fort Lewis, Washington was redesignated as 2nd Stryker Cavalry Regiment and moved to Vilseck, Germany.
As of March 2009, 1st Brigade, 2nd Brigade, and 3rd Brigade are deployed to Iraq in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom with 4th Brigade deployed to Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom.
In June–August 2009, the 25th Division was deployed in Operation Champion Sword.
In April 2011, the 25ths 3rd Brigade Combat Team assumed control of the most hostile area of Afghanistan, Regional Command East. A few months later the 1st Brigade deployed to RC-South.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was authorized on 25 September 1944. The taro leaf is indicative of the descent of the 25th Division from the Hawaiian Division, while the lightning flash is representative of the manner in which the Division performs its allotted assignments.

The distinctive insignia was approved on 21 April 1965. It was amended on 18 May 1972, to correct the nickname of the 25th Infantry Division in the symbolism. The lightning flash, adopted from the shoulder sleeve insignia of the 25th Infantry Division and the enclosing palm branches allude to the Division nickname “Tropic Lightning”. The erupting volcano is an allusion to the State of Hawaii.




The 28th Infantry Division ("Keystone") is a unit of the Army National Guard and is the oldest division-sized unit in the armed forces of the United States. The division was officially established in 1879 and was later redesignated as the 28th Division in 1917, after the entry of America into the First World War. It continues its service today as part of the Pennsylvania Army National Guard.
It is nicknamed the "Keystone Division," as it was formed from units of the Pennsylvania Army National Guard; Pennsylvania is known as the "Keystone State". It was also nicknamed the "Bloody Bucket" division by German forces during the Second World War due to its red insignia. The 28th is the first Army National Guard division to field the Stryker infantry fighting vehicle, as part of the Army's modern transformation.
Co A, 28th Signal Battalion deployed in April 2004 to April 2005 in support of major combat missions in the Anbar province. Elements of the 1st Battalion operated in Iraq from February to December 2004, serving in Kirkush, Tuz Khurmatu, Jalawla, and Baghdad. Assigned to the 28th Infantry Division in September 2008, the 2nd Squadron, 107th Cavalry during the years 2006–2010 deployed at different times Troops A, B, & C in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom conducting various SECFOR and Convoy Escort missions. In December 2003 the 1st Battalion 107th FA was activated and received Military Police training at Fort Dix, New Jersey. Following a month of training, the soldiers of the 107th where deployed to Iraq for Operation Iraqi Freedom. In January, 2004, B and C Companies of the 2nd Battalion, 103rd Armor Regiment were activated and, with attachments from several other Pennsylvania Army National Guard units, reconfigured as military police companies and trained at Ft. Dix for deployment to Iraq. Once in Iraq, they were assigned to some of the most sensitive missions of OIF II. Three platoons of Bravo Company (1st, 3rd and Headquarters) were attached to the Iraq Survey Group; while 2nd and 4th Platoons served in Iraqi Police Support, later as area patrols for Camp Fallujah and eventually as transportation escorts for high-ranking Iraqi government officials. Charlie Company was assigned to the HVD facility at Camp Cropper, with an entire platoon assigned solely to former Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein. The units both redeployed in March 2005. In June 2004, the 1st Battalion, 103rd Armor was activated at Fort Bliss, Texas and deployed to Iraq in November in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. This marked the first deployment of a 28th ID combat battalion to a war zone since World War II. The battalion, now designated as a Task Force (Task Force DRAGOON), was stationed at Forward Operating Base Summerall, near Bayji. Attached initially to the 2nd Brigade, 1st Infantry Division, and then the 1st Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division, the 800 man TF 1–103rd Armor, commanded by LTC Philip J. Logan, engaged in combat operations for 12 months, including combat operations in Salah Ad Din Province, a heavily Sunni Muslim area in the north part of the "Sunni Triangle", before redeploying to the United States in November, 2005. 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 28th Infantry Division (2/28 BCT) was mobilized in January 2005, and in late June and early July 2005 2nd Brigade soldiers began deploying to the Al-Anbar province. The 56th SBCT, based out Camp Taji, Iraq, conducted operations in the northern Baghdad Governorate from January to September 2009, before redeploying to Kuwait and returning home at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst. Soldiers of the Combat Aviation Brigade, 28th Infantry Division began mobilization on 29 January 2009 for Operation Iraqi Freedom.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 19 October 1918. The keystone, symbol of the state of Pennsylvania, alludes to the nickname of the Division.

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 28th Infantry Division Headquarters; Headquarters Detachment, 28th Division; Headquarters Company, 28th Division; Headquarters Special Troops, 28th Division and Headquarters Detachment Special Troops, 28th Division on 6 February 1929. It was redesignated for the non-color bearing units of the 28th Infantry Division on 10 July 1968. The device was designed by Benjamin Franklin. In 1747, during the war of the Spanish Succession, the Spaniards threatened Philadelphia, coming up the Delaware as far as New Castle. Dr. Franklin aroused the people and designed a crest and flag which was carried through Philadelphia in 1748 by Colonel Taylor’s Battalion. The shield on the device is that of William Penn, while the colors of the wreath, red and white, denote the predominantly English origin of the early settlements.





The 29th Infantry Division ("Blue and Grey") is an infantry division of the United States Army based in Fort Belvoir, Virginia. It is a formation of the United States Army National Guard and contains units from Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina.
Formed in 1917, the division quickly gained the nickname "Blue and Gray", reflecting on the fact that it comprised soldiers from states on both sides of the American Civil War. Deployed to France as a part of the American Expeditionary Force during World War I, the division saw intense combat in the final days of the war, and suffered heavy casualties. At the end of the war, it demobilized, though remained an active National Guard unit.
Called up for service again in World War II, the division was sent to England where it trained for two years, before participating in Operation Overlord, the landings in Normandy, France. The division is best known for being among the first wave of troops to the shore at Omaha Beach, suffering massive casualties in the process. It then advanced to Saint-Lô, and eventually through France and into Germany itself. These actions have since been the subject of many motion pictures and video games.
Following the end of World War II, the division saw frequent reorganizations and deactivations. Although the 29th did not see combat through most of the next 50 years, it participated in numerous training exercises throughout the world. It eventually saw deployment to Kosovo as a commanding element in Kosovo Force, and units of the division also deployed to locations such as Guantanamo Bay Naval Base and Afghanistan as a part of Operation Enduring Freedom, and Iraq as a part of Operation Iraqi Freedom.
The division underwent major reorganization in 2006. A Special Troops Battalion was added to the division's command structure, and its three brigades were redesignated. It was organized around three brigades; the 30th Heavy Brigade Combat Team of North Carolina, the 116th Infantry Brigade Combat Team of Virginia, and the Combat Aviation Brigade 29th Infantry Division of Maryland.
In December 2006, the division took command of the Eastern region of Kosovo's peacekeeping force, to provide security in the region. The division's soldiers were deployed to secure the region for around a year, returning in November 2007. In 2007, several units of the division, including the 175th Infantry Regiment, deployed to support Operation Iraqi Freedom. At 1,300 soldiers, this deployment was the largest for the 29th Infantry Division since World War II, however the division headquarters itself was not deployed.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 29th Division by telegram. It was reaffirmed by letter on 17 Jun 1922. The insignia was amended on 4 May 1925 to change the description. On 16 May 1985 the shoulder sleeve insignia was approved for the 29th Infantry Division and amended to update the description and include a symbolism. In 1919, when shoulder sleeve insignia were first authorized, the division comprised of two masses of men, one from the North and the other from the South. Therefore, the North is represented by the blue and the South by the gray.

The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 2 Jul 1985. The unit's participation in campaigns of both World War I and World War II, in France and Central Europe, is represented by the fleur-de-lis, with the bayonet at center denoting the Infantry combat function, the colors red and green and the barbs of the fleur-de-lis denote the award of the French Croix de Guerre with Palm, World War II, for participation in the amphibious landing on the beaches of Normandy. The color blue is traditional to the Infantry branch and gold is symbolic of honor and achievement.




The 34th Infantry Division is a division in the Army National Guard that participated in World War I, World War II and continues to serve today, with most of the Division part of the Minnesota and Iowa National Guard. It holds the distinctions of being the first US Division deployed to Europe in World War II. The division takes its name from the shoulder sleeve insignia designed for a 1917 training camp contest by American regionalist artist Marvin Cone, who was then a soldier enlisted in the unit. In World War I, the unit was called the "Sandstorm Division." German troops in World War II, however, called the U.S. division's soldiers "Red Devils" and "Red Bulls"; the division later officially adopted the latter nickname. The United States Army Rangers also trace their lineage back to the 34th Division. The modern incarnation of the Rangers were developed from 34th Infantry volunteers in Ireland under the command of Major William O. Darby.
The 34th Infantry Division was the first National Guard Division to transform to the Army's modular and expeditionary Brigade Combat Team Structure. The Division's force structure has grown and is now spread across several Midwest states (Minnesota, Iowa, Wisconsin, Michigan, North Dakota, Montana, Idaho, Colorado, Wyoming and Missouri). In May 2004, the 1st Battalion, 168th Infantry Regiment (augmented by Company D, 2nd Battalion, 135th Infantry Regiment), 2nd Brigade, 34th Infantry Division, and with nearly 100 key positions filled by members of the 1st Battalion (IRONMAN), 133rd Infantry Regiment, 2nd Brigade, 34th Infantry Division, commenced combat operations at 13 Provincial Reconstruction Team sites throughout Afghanistan as part of Operation Enduring Freedom, returning the Red Bull patch to combat after 59 years and earning the Battalion the distinction of becoming the first unit in the 34th Infantry Division to wear the Red Bull patch as a right-shoulder combat patch since World War II. In March 2006, the first brigade of the 34th Infantry Division commenced combat operations in central and southern Iraq as part of Operation Iraqi Freedom, marking the largest single unit deployment for the 34th Infantry Division since World War II. With its return in July 2007, the brigade became one of the longest serving unit (Activated for 22 months total with 16 in Iraq) in Iraq of the Army National Guard. In August 2010, nearly 3,000 Iowa Army National Guard soldiers, with 28 hometown send-offs, officially left for a yearlong deployment to Afghanistan, making it the largest deployment of the Iowa National Guard since World War II. Augmented by the 1–134th Cavalry Reconnaissance and Surveillance Squadron of the Nebraska Army National Guard, the brigade conducted pre-mobilization training began in Mississippi and also took place in California. The troops plan to partner with Afghanistan security forces to provide security and assist in training.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 34th Division on 28 June 1922. It was redesignated for the 34th Command Headquarters (Divisional), Iowa National Guard on 16 October 1963. The insignia was redesignated for the 34th Infantry Division effective 10 February 1991, and amended to add a border and provide a symbolism for the design.  The patch shape simulates an olla (Mexican water flask) symbolizing the 34th Division’s origin, formation and intensive training site at Camp Cody, New Mexico in Oct 1917. The bull skull also symbolizes the surrounding dry, desert-like area. Black denotes durability, firmness and stability and red is for courage and action.

The distinctive unit insignia was authorized on 27 December 1990. Blue reflects the Infantry. The black olla (a Mexican water flask), suggestive of training in New Mexico during World War I, is adapted from the original 34th Infantry Division, shoulder sleeve insignia and conveys the unit’s heritage. The stylized red bovine skull is also taken from that insignia and is symbolic of vitality, courage and strength. The two fasces imply authority and commemorate the unit’s campaign service in Italy during World War II. The gold fleur-de-lis alludes to excellence and the Division’s French Croix de Guerre for service in World War II. The motto, “Attack, Attack, Attack”, was adopted by the Division in 1943 and characterized the nature of the Division’s combat operations for the remainder of World War II.




The 35th Infantry Division ("Santa Fe") has been a formation of the National Guard since World War I. It is headquartered at Fort Leavenworth and its personnel come from Illinois, Kansas and Missouri.
The division was organized in August 1917 as a National Guard formation with troops from Kansas and Missouri, after a few months as the 14th Division. It consisted of the 69th Infantry Brigade (137th and 138th Infantry Regiments) and the 70th Infantry Brigade (139th and 140th Infantry Regiments). After several activations and reactivations in the immediate postwar years, the 35th Infantry Division (Mechanized) was reactivated on 25 August 1984 from the 67th Infantry Brigade (Mechanized) of Nebraska, the 69th Infantry Brigade (Mechanized) of Kansas, and the 149th Armored Brigade from Kentucky.[5] It continues in service today. The 35th Infantry Division Headquarters Commanded Task Force Eagle of Multi-National Division North in Bosnia and Herzegovina as part of SFOR-13 (Stabilization Force) with the NATO peacekeeping mandate under the Dayton Peace Accords. The 35th also provided headquarters control for the National Guard units deployed to Louisiana in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. A detachment of the 35th Infantry Division was the headquarters element for Task Force Falcon of Multi-National Task Force East (MNTF-E) for the Kosovo Force Kosovo Force 9 (KFOR 9) mission. KFOR is a NATO-led international force responsible for establishing a safe and secure environment in Kosovo, the self-proclaimed, independent and partially recognized landlocked country in the Balkans, which has been under UN administration since 1999. The 35th provided the command elements from 7 November 2007 until 7 July 2008, when succeeded by 110th MEB of the Missouri National Guard.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 35th Division on 29 Oct 1918 by telegram and officially announced on 8 Jun 1922. It was redesignated on 17 Oct 1963 for the 35th Command Headquarters (Divisional). On 23 Jul 1968 the insignia was assigned to the 35th Engineer Brigade. The shoulder sleeve insignia was restored to the 35th Infantry Division and amended to change the description and add a symbolism on 27 Aug 1984. The Santa Fe Cross was a symbol used to mark the old Santa Fe trail, an area where the unit trained, and was officially designated as an identifying device for the unit by Headquarters, 35th Division, General Orders Number 25, dated March 27, 1918. The organization is referred to as the Santa Fe Division.

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 35th Division on 27 Aug 1934. It was amended to change the schooner from gold to silver on 29 Feb 1984. On 6 Apr 1984 the insignia was authorized for the 35th Infantry Division and amended to change the schooner from silver to gold. The nonagon in blue indicates that the 35th is an Infantry Division composed of nine regiments. The prairie schooner drawn by the oxen symbolizes the fact that all of the great trails to Oregon, California and Mexico either started from, or passed through, the states to which the 35th was formerly allotted.




The 36th Infantry Division ("Arrowhead"), also known as the Texas Division, is a modular division of the United States Army and the Texas Army National Guard. It was activated for service in World War II on 25 November 1940, and was sent overseas in April 1943.
It was reorganized in May 2004 from the 49th Armored Division. The 36th Infantry Division was originally activated as the 15th Division, an Army National Guard Division from Texas and Oklahoma. The designation was changed to the 36th Division in 1917, possibly in July. It consisted of the 71st Infantry Brigade (141st and 142nd Infantry Regiments) and the 72nd Infantry Brigade (143rd and 144th Infantry Regiments). The unit was sent to Europe in July 1918 and conducted major operations in the Meuse-Argonne Offensive. The unit was inactivated in June 1919.
On 1 May 2004, the 49th Armored Division of the Texas Army National Guard was officially deactivated and the 49th Armored Division was redesignated the 36th Infantry Division. After half a century, the "Fighting 36th" was reactivated to help transform Texas' military forces into a more mobile and lethal fighting force, committed to helping fight the global war on terrorism and carrying on the proud legacy established by its predecessors.
In January 2004, 74 soldiers from Alpha Battery (TAB) 2nd Battalion 131st Field Artillery were activated for federal service in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. In 2005 approximately 100 soldiers of the 36th Infantry Division deployed to Bosnia for Enduring Mission 3 which was a continuation from previous IFOR and SFOR missions. In 2005, over three thousand troops from the 56th BCT, 36th ID deployed to Iraq as part of the largest deployment of Texas troops since World War II. 3/133 FA, 2/142 INF were both awarded Meritorious Unit Citations for their service in Iraq. In 2005–2006, 800 Soldiers of 3d Battalion, 141st Infantry Regiment, 72d Brigade, 36th Infantry Division deployed to Afghanistan for combat operations. The Battalion was attached to the 504th Infantry Regiment of the 82d Airborne Division and earned a Joint Meritorious Unit Citation. In 2006, the 1st Squadron, 124th Cavalry Regiment, 36th Infantry Division became the first cavalry unit to serve as peacekeepers in the Sinai Desert for the Multinational Force and Observers. The force was made up of soldiers from several units of the 36th Infantry Division including 1–112th AR, 2–112th AR, 3–112th AR, 3rd Mech, and C Btry 2-131 FA (MLRS). In late 2005 to late 2006, the 36th Infantry Division was the major leading force for KFOR7, the peacekeeping mission on Kosovo. In late 2006, Company B of the 3d Battalion, 144th Infantry Regiment deployed to Iraq after pre-deployment training at Ft. Dix, NJ and were actively engaged in combat operations. They returned in late 2007. The Combat Aviation Brigade, 36th Infantry Division shipped to Iraq in September 2006 for a planned one-year deployment. On 7 May 2007 3d Battalion 144th Infantry Regiment mobilized as "Task Force Panther" in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. On 28 August 2009, more than 3000 Soldiers of the 56th IBCT again deployed to Iraq in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. On 1 October 2009, the 72nd IBCT mobilized for deployment to Iraq. Upon arrival in theater, the brigade headquarters assumed authority as the Joint Area Support Group-Conditional for the International Zone, with the brigade's subordinate elements distributed throughout the country doing detainee operations. The brigade returned from Iraq in July and August 2010, with A Btry 1-133 FA being the last element to return home.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 36th Infantry Division on 12 November 1918. It was redesignated for the 71st Infantry Brigade on 7 May 1968. It was redesignated for the 71st Airborne Brigade, Texas Army National Guard on 10 March 1969. The insignia was redesignated effective 1 May 2004, with the description updated, for the 36th Infantry Division. On a flint Indian arrowhead, point down, of French horizon blue, an olive drab block “T”. The flint arrowhead represents the State of Oklahoma (once the Indian Territory), and the "T" is for Texas.

The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 18 February 2005, and cancelled the previous design which was originally approved for the 71st Airborne Brigade on 3 April 1972 and redesignated effective 1 May 2004, with the description updated, for the 36th Infantry Division. The arrowhead and the “T” are adapted from the unit’s shoulder sleeve insignia, worn by the soldiers of the 36th Infantry Division during European Operations in World War II.




The 38th Infantry Division ("Cyclone") is an Indiana Army National Guard division in the United States Army headquartered at Stout Field in Indianapolis, Indiana and presently undergoing transformation. As a division, it saw service in both World War I and World War II.  The Division was activated in August 1917 as a National Guard Division from Indiana, Kentucky, and West Virginia. It had previously been in existence for a few months as the 17th Division, drawing personnel from Indiana and Kentucky only.
While training for the European war at Camp Shelby, Mississippi, the 38th was hit by a cyclone, killing Pvt. Vaughn D. Beekman, and giving the 38th the nickname of Cyclone Division. Company D (Ranger), 151st Infantry was one of a small number of National Guard units mobilized for service in the Republic of Vietnam and was one of the most highly decorated units to serve in that conflict. Since 11 September 2001, the 38th Infantry Division has provided headquarters and forces for a variety of operational rotations including Operation Iraqi Freedom (Iraq), Operation Enduring Freedom (Afghanistan), Operation Joint Forge (Bosnia), Operation Joint Guardian (Kosovo), Combined Joint Task Force - Horn of Africa (Djibouti), Multinational Force and Observers (Egypt), United States Air Forces Europe(USAFE) Force Protection (England, Germany, Italy, and Belgium), and Operation Noble Eagle (Continental United States) Rotations I through IV.

The shoulder sleeve insignia originally approved by telegram for the 38th Infantry on 30 Oct 1918. It was officially announced on 19 Jun 1922. It was redesignated on 22 Aug 1963 for the 38th Infantry Division. On 25 Jan 1966 the insignia was amended to correct the wording of the description. The monogram "C Y" alludes to the nickname of the division, the "Cyclone Division."

The distinctive unit insignia approved on 18 Dec 1969. This distinctive unit insignia replaced as previously authorized on 22 Jul 1931 and cancelled on 21 Aug 1963. The clover leaf is reminiscent of the original badge for non-color bearing units of the 38th Infantry Division. The lightning flashes represent the unit's participation in three campaigns in the Pacific Theater of World War II (New Guinea, Leyte, Luzon) and an assault landing on Luzon is indicated by the arrowhead tip in the center flash. Further, the cloud and lightning flashes allude to the cyclone, a circular counterclockwise rotating storm from which the Division takes its name. The colors blue, white and red refer to the Philippine Presidential Unit Citation awarded to the unit for World War II service during the period 17 Oct 1944 to 4 Jul 1945.




The 40th Infantry Division (Mechanized) ("Sunshine Division") is a modular division of the United States Army. Following the army's modularization the division has become a four brigade combat team division with National Guardsmen from throughout the Pacific/Western United States and Oceania. Its Division Headquarters is located at Los Alamitos Joint Forces Training Base in Los Alamitos, California.
The 40th Infantry Division was organized at Camp Kearny, near San Diego, California, on 16 September 1917, originally designated as the 19th Division. It was composed of National Guard units from the states of Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, and Utah. After seeing service in World War I as a depot division, it was reorganized as the National Guard division for California, Nevada, and Utah, before seeing service in the Pacific Theatre of World War II. Later, the division served in Korea and some of its units were designated for Vietnam. The division was redesignated the National Guard unit for California alone, and it continues to serve domestically as such, mostly in homeland security operations. In July 2006, as part of the Army National Guard's modularization process, the 40th Infantry Division reorganized into four brigade combat teams and one aviation brigade. National Guard units from California, Oregon, Hawaii, Arizona, Washington, Alaska, New Mexico, Indiana, Nebraska, Utah and Guam are today part of the 40th Infantry Division.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 40th Division on 23 Nov 1918. It was redesignated for the 40th Armored Division on 27 Jul 1954 and rescinded on 23 Sep 1954. The insignia was reinstated and approved for the 40th Infantry Brigade on 1 May 1968. On 21 Jan 1974 the insignia was redesignated for the 40th Infantry Division. The sun design alludes to California where the division had its origin, while the blue field alludes to the sky and the Pacific Ocean.

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for 40th Infantry Brigade on 13 Jan 1970. It was redesignated for the 40th Infantry Division on 31 Jan 1974. The semi-sunburst was suggested by the unit's shoulder sleeve insignia and represents the Division's allocation to the State of California. The demi-fleur-de-lis symbolizes service in World War I. The outer rim of sun rays refers to the Philippine Presidential Unit Citation award. The red arrowhead alludes to the fire power of the unit and represents their assault landing at Luzon in World War II. The Torii gate, a symbol of the Far East, refers to the awarded Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citation.




The 42nd Infantry Division (42ID) ("Rainbow") is a division of the National Guard and United States Army. The 42nd Infantry Division has served in World War I, World War II and the Global War on Terrorism (GWOT). The division is currently headquartered at the Glenmore Armory in North Greenbush, New York with the New York National Guard.
The division presently includes Army National Guard units from fourteen different states, including Connecticut, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Mississippi, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Vermont and Wisconsin. As of 2007, 67 percent of 42ID soldiers are located in New York and New Jersey.
The 42nd Division adopted a shoulder patch and unit crests acknowledging the nickname. The original version of the patch symbolized a half arc rainbow and contained thin bands in multiple colors. During the latter part of World War I and post war occupation duty in Germany, Rainbow Division soldiers modified the patch to a quarter arc, removing half the symbol to memorialize the half of the division's soldiers who became casualties (killed or wounded) during the war. They also reduced the number of colors to just red, gold and blue bordered in green, in order to standardize the design and make the patch easier to reproduce.
Since then the onset of the 11 September attacks, the 42ID has been extensively involved in the war on terrorism, in both Homeland Security (HLS) and Expeditionary Operations. Units of the 42ID from the New York Army National Guard provided security at Ground Zero during the rescue and then recovery efforts there. The first major deployed effort of the 42ID was the deployment of elements of the 50th BCT/42ID to Guantanamo Bay Naval Base, Cuba. The 2/108th Inf deployed to the Iraq Theater of Operation (ITO) in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) in 2004. In 2004/2005 the 1/69 Inf served in the ITO (Iraq); eventually assuming responsibility for security on the Baghdad International Airport (BIAP) Road. The 42nd CAB also deployed to the ITO (Iraq) during this period. In 2004 the Division Headquarters and division troops of the 42nd Infantry Division, the "Rainbow" Division, were mobilized for service in the ITO (Iraq). The 42ID was deployed to the Iraq Theater of Operations (ITO) as part of Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) III, relieving the 1st Infantry Division (1ID). The 42ID Headquarters and Division Troops (DISCOM, 250th Sig Bn) were the first National Guard division to be sent to an active combat area of operations under its own command since the Korean War. The "Rainbow Division" controlled the north-central Iraq area of operations, and was the first National Guard contingent to be in charge of an entire area of operation in the Middle East. Serving as the command and control (C2) of Task Force Liberty, the 42ID took over responsibility for the area known as Multi-National Division North Central (MND-NC) including the provinces of Salah Ah Din, Diyala, At Tamamim (Kirkuk) and As Sulymaniah from the 1st Infantry Division (1ID) on 14 February 2005. The 42ID directed the operations of 1st BCT, 3ID, 3rd BCT, 3ID, the 278th RCT,3rd- 133rd FA 56th BCT (Texas Army National Guard) and the 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team (Idaho, Oregon, and Montana Army National Guard). In 2008, two BCTs of the 42ID deployed in support of Global War on Terror (GWOT). The 50th IBCT, headquartered at Ft. Dix, NJ, deployed to the ITO (Iraq) as part of the 2008–2010 rotation of Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF). In 2008 the 27th IBCT, headquartered in Syracuse, NY, was mobilized and deployed to Afghanistan in order to train Afghan National Army (ANA) and Police forces in support of Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF).

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved by telegram for the 42d Division on 29 October 1918. It was officially authorized for wear in the United States by the War Department on 27 May 1922. The insignia was redesignated for the 42d Infantry Division on 8 September 1947. It was amended to include an Army green border on 24 March 1966. The 42d Infantry Division is known as the “Rainbow Division” because personnel from 26 states originally formed the Division.

The distinctive unit insignia was authorized on 3 June 1976. Blue is the color used for Infantry. The rainbow alludes to the shoulder sleeve insignia of the Division and spanning across two fleurs-de-lis symbolize their combat service in France during both World War I and World War II. The sun, adapted from the seal of the State of New York, refers to the location and home area of the 42d Infantry Division.




The 82nd Airborne Division is an active airborne infantry division of the United States Army specializing in parachute landing operations. Based at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, the 82nd Airborne Division is the primary fighting arm of the XVIII Airborne Corps.
The 82nd Division was constituted in the National Army on 5 August 1917, and was organized on 25 August 1917, at Camp Gordon, Georgia. Since its initial members came from all 48 states, the unit acquired the nickname “All-American", which is the basis for its famed “AA” shoulder patch. It sailed to Europe to join the American Expeditionary Force in fighting World War I. On 15 August 1942, the 82nd Infantry Division became the Army's first airborne division, and was redesignated the 82nd Airborne Division. In April 1943, its paratroopers deployed to North Africa under the command of Major General Matthew B. Ridgway to participate in the campaign to invade Italy. In January 1944, the 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment, which was temporarily detached to fight at Anzio, adopted the nickname "Devils in Baggy Pants," taken from an entry in a German officer's diary. While the 504th was detached, the remainder of the 82nd moved to the United Kingdom in November 1943 to prepare for the liberation of Europe. With two combat assaults under its belt, the 82nd Airborne Division was now ready for the most ambitious airborne operation of the war so far, as part of Operation Neptune, the invasion of Normandy. The Division conducted Operation Boston, part of the airborne assault phase of the Operation Overlord plan. The division returned to the United States on 3 January 1946.
In April 1965, the "All-Americans" entered the civil war in the Dominican Republic. Spearheaded by the 3rd Brigade, the 82nd deployed in Operation Power Pack.
A year later, the 82nd went into action in Vietnam. During the Tet Offensive, which swept across the Vietnam in January 1968, the 3rd Brigade was en route to Chu Lai within 24 hours of receiving its orders. The 3rd Brigade performed combat duties in the Huế – Phu Bai area of the I Corps sector. Later the brigade moved south to Saigon, and fought in the Mekong Delta, the Iron Triangle and along the Cambodian border, serving nearly 22 months. On 25 October 1983, elements of the 82nd provided support to the 1st and 2nd Ranger Battalions in the invasion of Grenada. In March 1988, a brigade task force made up of two battalions from the 504th Infantry Regiment and 3rd Battalion (Airborne), 505th Infantry, conducted a parachute insertion and air/land operation into Honduras as part of Operation Golden Pheasant. On 20 December 1989, the "All-American," as part of the United States invasion of Panama, conducted their first combat jump since World War II onto Torrijos International Airport, Panama. Six days after the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait on 2 August 1990, the 82nd became the vanguard of the largest deployment of American troops since Vietnam as part of Operation Desert Shield. On 16 September 1994, the 82d Airborne Division joined Operation Restore Democracy in Haïti. In December 1994, the 2/505 Parachute Infantry Regiment, deployed as part of Operations Safe Haven and Safe Passage, guarding Cuban refugees. In December 1995, battalions of the 82nd prepared for a possible parachute jump to support elements of the 1st Armored Division which had been ordered to Bosnia-Herzegovina as part of Operation Joint Endeavor. In March 1999 the 2/505 deployed to Albania and forward deployed along the Albania/Kosovo border in support of Operation Allied Force.
The 82nd's 49th Public Affairs Detachment deployed to Afghanistan in October 2001 in support of Operation Enduring Freedom along with several individual 82nd soldiers who deployed to the Central Command Area of Responsibility to support combat operations.
In June 2002, elements of the Division Headquarters and 3rd Brigade deployed to Afghanistan. In January 2003 1st Brigade relieved 3rd Brigade. During 1st Brigade's tour in Afghanistan, 70 soldiers from B Company, 3/504, in conjunction with A Company, 2nd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, jumped into western Afghanistan, an operation that remained classified for over a year. In March 2003, 2–325 and 3-325 Airborne Infantry of the 2nd BCT was attached to the 75th Ranger Regiment as part of a Special Operations Task Force to conduct a parachute assault to seize Saddam International Airport in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. On 4 January 2007, 2nd BCT deployed once again to Iraq in support of OIF. On 6 June 2007, 1st Brigade deployed to Southern Iraq, returning on 18 March 2008. In December 2008 3rd BCT deployed to Baghdad, Iraq and redeployed to Ft. Bragg In November 2009. In August 2009 1st BCT deployed once again to Iraq and redeployed late July 2010. In January 2007, the Division Headquarters, 4th BCT (includes 1–508th and 2–508th) and the Aviation Brigade deployed to Afghanistan as Combined Joint Task Force-82 (CJTF-82) for Operation Enduring Freedom VIII.
In January 2006, the division began reorganizing from a division based organization to a brigade combat team based organization. Activated elements include a 4th Brigade Combat Team (1–508th INF, 2–508th INF, 4–73rd Cav (RSTA), 2–321st FA, 782nd BSB, and STB, 4th BCT) and the inactivation of the Division Artillery, 82nd Signal Battalion, and 313th Military Intelligence Battalion. The 82nd Division Support Command (DISCOM) was redesignated as the 82nd Sustainment Brigade. A pathfinder unit was reactivated within the 82nd when the Long Range Surveillance Detachment of the inactivating 313th MI Bn was transferred to the 2nd Battalion, 82nd Aviation Regiment and converted to a pathfinder role.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved for the 82d Division by the Adjutant General, American Expeditionary Forces on 21 October 1918 and was confirmed by The Adjutant General on 8 July 1922. The insignia was redesignated for the 82d Airborne Division and an “Airborne” tab authorized on 31 August 1942. Authorization for the tab was rescinded on 29 January 1947 and subsequently restored on 23 December 1948 and announced later on 1 March 1949. The double “A” refers to the nickname “All American Division” adopted by the organization in France during World War I.

The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 23 October 1942. It was redesignated for the Command and Control Battalion, 82d Airborne Division on 21 April 1958. It was redesignated for the noncolor bearing units of the 82d Airborne Division on 6 June 1966. The insignia was cancelled and a distinctive unit insignia of the same design as the shoulder sleeve was authorized on 31 July 1990. The original insignia was reinstated on 21 May 1998. The fleur-de-lis is representative of the battle honors earned in France during World War I. The wings are symbolic of the Division’s mission. The motto is expressive of the personnel of the organization either on land or in the air.




The 95th Infantry Division was an infantry division of the United States Army. Today it exists as the 95th Training Division, a component of the United States Army Reserve headquartered at Fort Sill, Oklahoma.
Activated too late to deploy for World War I, the division remained in the Army's reserve until World War II, when it was sent to Europe. Renowned for fighting back fierce German counterattacks, the division earned the nickname "Iron Men of Metz" for fighting to liberate and defend the town. After World War II, the division spent another brief period in reserve before being activated as one of the Army's training divisions.
Over the next fifty years the division would see numerous changes to its structure as its training roles changed and subordinate units shifted in and out of its command. It activated a large number of regimental and brigade commands to fulfill various training roles. The division then began conducting One Station Unit Training, a responsibility it continues to this day. The division continued its mission of training and operating One Station Unit Training. In 1996, the division received three additional brigades as part of an Army consolidation of training commands. The 5th Brigade, 95th Division was activated in San Antonio, Texas, the 6th Brigade, 95th Division was activated in Topeka, Kansas, and the 7th Brigade, 95th Division was activated from the 95th Training Command in Little Rock, Arkansas.
In 2000, the brigade took on the additional responsibility of training Reserve Officer's Training Corps cadets. The 8th Brigade, 95th Division was activated as a provisional unit in charge of ROTC units throughout the southwestern United States. In 2005, the division headquarters were relocated to Fort Sill, Oklahoma. This put the division at the area's major training center, allowing it to more effectively provide training oversight.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 95th Infantry Division on 29 August 1942. It was redesignated for the 95th Division (Training) on 24 June 1968. It was amended to revise the description on 14 April 1972. The insignia was redesignated effective 16 September 2009, for the 95th Training Division. The colors red, white, and blue are the National colors, the number 9 interlaced with the Roman numeral V refers to the numerical designation of the Division.

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 95th Division (Training) on 22 December 1966. It was redesignated for the 95th Training Division effective 16 September 2009. The device commemorates the crossing of the Moselle River and the breakthrough at Metz symbolized by the blue wavy band and the black fortress. The blue wavy band further alludes to the Distinctive Unit Citation the Division received for this action in World War II. The arrow alludes to the letter “V” for victory, and the nickname given the organization.




The 100th Division (Operational Support) (formerly the 100th Infantry Division) is a Total Army Schools System (TASS) Training Division of the United States Army headquartered in Louisville, Kentucky. It currently serves as a major training command of the United States Army Reserves.
Throughout its long history, the division has taken on numerous roles. Serving as the 100th Infantry Division until the 1950s, the division then briefly became the 100th Airborne Division. The division then became the 100th Division (Institutional Training) and remained so until 2008, when it became the 100th Division (Operational Support). Since this transformation, the division has primarily taken on numerous training roles for the United States Army Reserves.
It was activated late in World War I, too late to join the fighting, but the division is best known for its exploits during World War II as the 100th Infantry Division. Fighting in the European Theater, the division advanced through France and Germany through the end of the war, fending off serious German counterattacks along the way. World War II would be the only war the division would fight in before taking on its role as a training unit.
At the outbreak of Operation Desert Storm in 1991, the 100th was assigned to armor training at Fort Knox, Kentucky for deploying armor units. Armor training was a responsibility that the division continued after the war.
In 1995 the Division was reorganized to include Army Reserve Schools, taking over the responsibilities for new programs. During 1997, the division was tasked with partial responsibility for Operation Future Challenge at Fort Knox, a six-week Reserve Officer's Training Corps Basic Camp during each summer. After the September 11, 2001 Attacks, the 100th Division began taking on the job of preparing Army National Guard units from Ohio and Kentucky as they began to prepare for deployment in support of the War on Terrorism.
By 2006, the division had moved its headquarters from Louisville to Fort Knox. In line with Army Reserve transformations, the 100th Division restructured, eliminating all but four of its brigades. The division shifted its focus from initial entry training to providing military occupational specialty and non-commissioned officer training for four army career fields across the United States. The new 100th Division (Operational Support) teaches Soldiers subjects from military intelligence, signal corps, civil affairs/psychological operations and health services.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 100th Division on 29 May 1923. It was redesignated for the 100th Airborne Division on 12 December 1946. The airborne tab was rescinded on 29 January 1947. The insignia was amended to add the airborne tab on 13 June 1951. It was redesignated for the 100th Infantry Division and amended to delete the airborne tab on 9 August 1956. The insignia was redesignated for the 100th Division on 7 September 1960. It was redesignated effective 16 September 2009, for the 100th Training Division and amended to add a symbolism. The insignia was amended to correct the redesignation date to reflect 16 September 2009. The blue shield represents Infantry; the numerals indicate the numerical designation of the Division.

The distinctive unit insignia was originally authorized for the 100th Division (Training) on 25 March 1968. It was amended to change the motto on 26 July 1989. It was redesignated effective 16 September 2009, for the 100th Training Division. The insignia was amended to correct the redesignation date to reflect 16 September 2009. The numerical identification of the unit is symbolized by a blossomed century plant. The fleur-de-lis refers to the Distinguished Unit Citation awarded the Division for combat service in France and Germany in World War II. The powder horn, a frequent companion of the long Kentucky rifle, symbolizes the historical background as the originally constituted Headquarters, 100th Infantry Division. The color green is used to represent the growth and vigor of the 100th Division Training program. The blue background alludes to the blue grass while the powder horn offers further reference to Kentucky.




The 101st Airborne Division—the "Screaming Eagles"—is a U.S. Army modular light infantry division trained for air assault operations. During World War II, it was renowned for its role in Operation Overlord, the D-Day landings on 6 June 1944, in Normandy, France, Operation Market Garden, the liberation of Holland and action during the Battle of the Bulge around the city of Bastogne, Belgium. During the Vietnam War, the 101st Airborne Division fought in several major campaigns and battles including the fight for Hamburger Hill in May 1969. Upon its arrival in Vietnam in 1965 (1st Brigade), followed by the 2nd and 3rd brigades in 1968), the division was an airborne unit. In mid-1968 it was reorganized and redesignated as an airmobile division, then in 1974 as an air assault division. Both of these titles reflect the fact that the division went from airplanes as the primary method of delivering troops into combat, to the use of helicopters as the way the division entered battle. Division headquarters is at Fort Campbell, Kentucky. In recent years, the division has served in Iraq and Afghanistan. The division is one of the most highly decorated units in the U.S. Army.
In January 1991, the 101st once again had its "Rendezvous with Destiny" in Iraq during the combat air assault into enemy territory. In August 2000, the 2nd battalion, 327th Infantry Regiment, as well as some elements from the 502nd Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) From Fort Campbell, Kentucky, helped secure the peace in Kosovo and support the October elections for the formation of the new Kosovo government. The 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) was the first conventional unit to deploy in support of the American War on Terrorism. The Division quickly deployed its 3rd Brigade, the 187th Infantry's Rakkasans, as the first conventional unit to fight as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. After an intense period of combat in rugged Shoh-I-Khot Mountains of eastern Afghanistan during Operation Anaconda with elements of the 10th Mountain Division, the Rakkasans redeployed to Fort Campbell only to find the 101st awaiting another deployment order. In 2008, the 101st 4th BCT Red and White "Currahee" including the 1st and the 2nd Battalions, 506th Infantry "Band of Brothers" were deployed to Afghanistan. The 101st Combat Aviation Brigade deployed to Afghanistan as Task Force Destiny in early 2008 to Bagram Air Base. 159th Combat Aviation Brigade deployed as Task Force Thunder to Afghanistan in early 2009. In March 2010, the 101st Combat Aviation Brigade deployed again to Afghanistan as Task Force Destiny to Kandahar Airfield to be the aviation asset in southern Afghanistan.
In 2003, Major General David H. Petraeus ("Eagle 6") led the Screaming Eagles to war during the 2003 invasion of Iraq (Operation Iraqi Freedom). The division was in V Corps, providing support to the 3rd Infantry Division by clearing Iraqi strongpoints which that division had bypassed. 3rd Battalion 187 inf regt (3rd Brigade) was attached to 3rd Infantry Division and was the main effort in clearing Saddam International Airport. The Division then went on to a tour of duty as part of the occupation forces of Iraq, using the city of Mosul as their primary base of operations. 1st and 2d Battalion, 327th Infantry Regiment (1st Brigade) oversaw the remote airfield Qayarrah West 30 miles (48 km) south of Mosul. The 502d Infantry Regiment (2d Brigade) and 3d Battalion, 327th Infantry Regiment were responsible for Mosul itself while the 187th Infantry Regiment (3d Brigade) controlled Tal Afar just north of Mosul. Once replaced by the first operational Stryker Brigade, the 101st was withdrawn in early 2004 for rest and refit. As part of the Army's modular transformation, the existing infantry brigades, artillery brigade, and aviation brigades were transformed. The Army also activated the 4th Brigade Combat Team, which includes the 1st and 2nd Battalions, 506th Infantry Regiment ("Currahee") and subordinate units. The reconfiguration of 101st formed seven major units in the division (four infantry BCTs, two combat aviation brigades (CABs), and one sustainment brigade), making it the largest formation currently in the U.S. Army.
The division's second deployment to Iraq began in the late summer of 2005. The division headquarters replaced the 42d Infantry Division, which had been directing security operations as the headquarters for Task Force Liberty. Renamed Task Force Band of Brothers, the 101st assumed responsibility on 1 November 2005 for four provinces in north central Iraq: Salah ad Din, As Sulymaniyah. On 30 December 2005, Task Force Band of Brothers also assumed responsibility for training Iraqi security forces and conducting security operations in Ninevah and Dahuk provinces as the headquarters for Task Force Freedom was disestablished. While the 1st, 2nd and 3rd Brigade Combat Teams were deployed to Iraq 2007–2008, the division headquarters, 4th Brigade Combat Team (506th Infantry Regiment), the 101st Sustainment Brigade, and the 101st Aviation Brigade followed by the 159th Aviation Brigade were deployed to Afghanistan for one-year tours falling within the 2007–2009 window. The Division Headquarters, 101st Combat Aviation Brigade (101st Aviation Regiment), 1st Brigade Combat Team (327th Infantry Regiment), 2nd Brigade Combat Team (502nd Infantry Regiment), 3rd Brigade Combat Team (187th Infantry Regiment), and 4th Brigade Combat Team (506th Infantry Regiment) deployed to Afghanistan in 2010.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 101st Division on 23 May 1923. It was redesignated for the 101st Airborne Division on 28 August 1942. It was redesignated for the 101st Air Cavalry Division on 5 August 1968. The insignia was redesignated for the 101st Airborne Division (Airmobile) on 10 September 1968. It was amended to update the description and correct the symbolism on 8 February 2006. The design is based on one of the Civil War traditions of the State of Wisconsin, this State being the territory of the original 101st Division. The eagle alludes to “Old Abe,” the famous war eagle carried into combat during the Civil War by the 8th Wisconsin Infantry Regiment.

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the Command and Control Battalion, 101st Airborne Division on 21 April 1958. It was redesignated for the noncolor bearing units of the 101st Airborne Division on 24 July 1968. It was redesignated for the 101st Air Cavalry Division on 5 August 1968. The insignia was redesignated for the noncolor bearing units of the 101st Airborne Division (Airmobile) and amended to include a symbolism on 10 September 1968. It was amended to correct the symbolism on 8 February 2006. The design was suggested by the Division’s authorized shoulder sleeve insignia. The black eagle alluding to “Old Abe,” an actual eagle carried into combat during the Civil War by one of the regiments from the State of Wisconsin, the territory of the original 101st Division. The eagle issuing in downward flight from the cloud refers to the airborne classification of the Division. The motto, “Rendezvous With Destiny” has been the motto of the Division since its founding.


104th Infantry Division



The 104th Infantry Division was an Infantry division of the United States Army. Today, it is known as the 104th Division (Leader Training) and based at Fort Lewis, Washington, as a training unit of the United States Army Reserve. Activated in 1921, the division was created as an infantry unit with a focus on nighttime combat operations. Deployed during World War II, the division saw almost 200 days of fighting in northwestern Europe as it fought through France, Belgium, and western Germany, fighting back several fierce German counterattacks as it advanced through the theater throughout late 1944 and 1945. This was the only combat duty that the 104th Infantry Division has served during its history. At the end of the fighting on 7 May 1945 (V-E Day), this division was in central Germany opposite the troops of its allies from the Soviet Army.After World War II, this division was reorganized primarily as a training division for Reserve forces. After several decades, the division then expanded its role to conducting entry-level training for soldiers of all branches of the Army in the northwestern United States. Its role and size have expanded over that time due to consolidation of other training commands, and the division subsequently took charge of a number of brigades specializing in various entry-level training for soldiers of all types.
In 1967, the division was reorganized. As part of an army wide initiative known as the Reorganization Objective Army Division plan, the division's regiments were disbanded and replaced with larger and more versatile brigades. The 1st Brigade, 104th Division, activated at Vancouver Barracks, and the 2nd Brigade, 104th Division activated at Pasco, Washington. Meanwhile, the 3rd Brigade, 104th Division, as well as the 4th Brigade, 104th Division both activated at Fort Lawton, Washington. Each of these brigades carried the history of other historic units which fought under the 104th Infantry Division in World War II. The 104th Division was then assigned the mission of conducting One Station Unit Training, Basic Combat Training, Advanced Individual Training, and Combat Support training. 1st Brigade took on basic combat training, while 3rd Brigade undertook combat support training, 4th Brigade conducted combat service support training. In 1996, three more brigades were added to the division's structure. The 5th Brigade, 104th Division was activated at Salt Lake City, Utah. The 6th Brigade, 104th Division was activated at Aurora, Colorado. The 7th Brigade, 104th Division activated at Vancouver, Washington. The 5th Brigade conducted health services training, 6th Brigade took charge of professional development training and 7th Brigade provided training support to the other brigades. These units were redesignated from other training commands and put under the command of the division. Two additional provisional brigades were created under the 104th Division in 1999; the 8th Brigade, 104th Division was created at Fort Lewis as a unit for training Reserve Officers' Training Corps cadets, and the 4690th US Army Reserve Forces School at Fort Shafter, Hawaii was redesignated as the 4690th Brigade, 104th Division, for service as a multifunctional training unit. In 2005, the Base Realignment and Closure suggestions included the closure of the Vancouver Barracks, and the 104th Division was subsequently relocated to Fort Lewis, Washington. In 2005, the Distinctive Unit Insignia was designed by Captain Roderic W. Langer under the direction of Major General Terrill K. Moffatt. The 104th received its new distinctive unit insignia in 2006. In October 2007, the division was renamed the 104th Division (Leader Training). This change reflected a change in the division's mission, specifically training officer and non-commissioned officer candidates in their assigned fields.
The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 104th Division on 16 August 1924.  It was redesignated for the 104th Division (Training) and amended to include a border and add symbolism for the design on 5 June 1985.  The insignia was redesignated for the 104th Division (Institutional Training) and amended to update the description on 15 August 2006.  It was redesignated effective 17 October 2007, for the 104th Training Division (Leader Training). The timber wolf represents the heartiness and vigor of life in the western states, tenacity in pursuit of mission accomplishment and unity of purpose associated with familial behavior.
The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 104th Division (Institutional Training) on 20 July 2006.  It was redesignated effective 17 October 2007, for the 104th Training Division (Leader Training) and amended to worn in pairs. The design is based on the historical actions of the Division while training for and campaigning in World War II.  The 104th Division was the first Army Division to actively train for nighttime operations as the norm.  It was the first military unit to develop written procedures for fighting at night and fighting on the European continent at night, its soldiers were issued hand grenades and bayonets (with no ammunition for their rifles) and told to attack the enemy.  104th Division soldiers were instructed that anyone firing a weapon was an enemy and should be attacked.  Using these methods, the 104th Division was successful over 195 days of continuous combat – never once giving ground to the enemy.


As always, the above insignia are available on a limited number of selected quality products via my “Military Insignia” galleries - "U.S. Army Infantry Divisions" at Zazzle. You may simply follow the direct links in the article to navigate to the corresponding galleries
I will also make my insignia designs available free of charge to any military units and personnel, for any non-profit/non-commercial and charitable causes, benefiting troops and their families. In addition, I would make my designs available free of charge to any military branches, formations and units for any non-commercial internal duty-specific purposes, such as unit-related web design, training materials or presentations, as I did on many occasions in the past.

The above information provided in part by The Institute of Heraldry, Global Security, Wikipedia as well as some of the unit websites

15 comments:

  1. These are phenomenal.

    Any chance of doing a 104th Infantry Division in 3D? A friend's father served in the 104th in WW2.

    Thanks!

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    1. @Michael

      Thanks! (And done - see above). Cheers.

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    2. Perfection! Thank you so very much!

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  2. This artwork is so awesome. If you ever do individual DUI's let me know or I am looking for someone to create one, depending on cost. What I am hoping to find is one of 9th Infantry Regiment featuring the "imperial five-toed dragon" as seen at http://www.manchu.org/linage/insignia.htm. Love the 7th Infantry Division art, I served from 1988-1994 at 9th Inf Regt at 7th Inf Div, Fort Ord, CA.

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    Replies
    1. @utbusta Thanks. Yes, I definitely have the 9th infantry DUI on my "to-do" list. Coming soon, stay tuned.

      Delete
  3. Great, can't wait. I didn't realize how long ago I posted this lol

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    Replies
    1. Well, if this is related to the above conversation (9th Infantry DUI), it has been done long time ago.
      Check it out here: http://militaryinsignia.blogspot.ca/search/label/9%20Inf%20Regt

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  4. I have a pin of my father's that I need some help on. Anyone willing to help? It is a sterling silver pin with a red cross and mountains profiled in the background. My dad was a CWO2 and has passed a LOT of insignia/patches down to me. I am having trouble figuring out what division this is from?

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    Replies
    1. Hi Melissa,

      My guess would be the 10th Mountain Division, but if you wish, you can send me a pic (see my profile for contact info), so that I could try and give you the exact answer...

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  5. Any chance you can do Aviation Brigades as well?

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  6. Do you have anything made of the 330th, and any of First Army , and there supporting Brigades?

    ReplyDelete

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